Local map

Places of interest in the vicinity

Fushimi-Inari Taisha shrine

Fushimi-Inari-Taisha is the head shrine of some 30,000 Inari-jinja shrines of Japan. Thousands of vermillion torii gateways and a lot of small shrines and stone monuments in its precinct make the atmosphere of the big Shinto shrine quite unique and interesting.

The big shrine spreads on a hillside and visitors should prepare for about two hours of walk ups and downs on stone stairways.

History

The history of Fushimi-Inari Taisha is not very clear. It is said to have been founded in the year 711 by Hata-no-Iroko (or, Irogu). Inari God was enshrined in three seats. i.e. Ue-no-yashiro (Upper shrine), Naka-no-yashiro (Middle shrine) and Shita-no-yashiro (Lower shrine). Later, two more were added. Those are Tanaka-sha and Shi-no-Okami.

All of the building was reduced to ashes on March 21, 1468 by fire of the Onin Civil War.

Honden, the main hall, was built in 1499 on the lower ground of the precinct and five seats were moved and enshrined together in the new hall. Since then, the places where the five gods had been enshrined (i.e. Ue-no-Yashiro, etc.) are called Shinseki, a (previous) site of god.

How to get to Fushimi-inari Taisha

5 minutes on JR lines from Kyoto station to Inari station that is in front of the main Torii gateway of the shrine, or
13 minutes on Kyoto City Bus from Kyoto station bus stop to Fushimi-Inari-Taisha bus stop and 7 minutes on foot, or
8 minutes on Keihan railway line from Gion-Shijo station to Fushimi-Inari station then 5 minutes on foot.

Hours and Admission

Free admission for 24 hours a day.

Photos

Click on a photo for full image.

Shinko-michi Souvenir shop Romon gate
Shinko-michi or Ura-sando (back approach).
June 24, 2001
Souvenir shop
November 27, 2008
Romon gate.
June 24, 2001
Romon gate looked through ni-no-torii A front view of Romon gate A ring of miscansus
Romon gate looked through Ni-no-Torii, the second torii gateway.
November 27, 2008
Romon gate that was donated in 1589 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. He prayed for his mother's recovery from illness.
June 24, 2001
A person passing through a ring of miscanthus in the Romon gate.
June 24, 2001
A guardian fox The other guardian fox A figure of a guard
A figure of a fox. Usually, shinto shrines have a pair of Komainu (guardian dogs) at the gate, but Inari jinja shrines uses foxes instead.
November 27, 2008
The other figure of a fox. A fox is believed to be a messenger of Inari God.
November 27, 2008
A figure of a guard in the Romon gate.
November 27, 2008
A figure of the other guard Gai-haiden Nai-haiden
The other guard.
November 27, 2008
Gai-haiden (the outer hall of worship) in between Romon gate and Haiden.
November 27, 2008
Nai-haiden, the inner hall of worship. Right behind this hall is Honden, the main hall.
November 27, 2008
Honden Kagura-den Musical instruments for Kagura
Honden, an important cultural property, that was built in 1499. This type, that has elongated front roof, is called Nagare-zukuri. On the right is Nai-haiden.
November 27, 2008
Kagura-den. Sacred music and dancing are performed in this hall. If you were lucky, you would see Miko (shrine maidens) performing Kagura.
June 24, 2001
Musical instruments for Kagura.
June 24, 2001
Gon-den Torii gateway to Tamayama-Inari-Sha Entrance of Senbon Torii
Gon-den. This building is located close to Honden and is used as a temporary house for the god when the Honden is being repaired or rebuilt. Also called Kari-dono (temporary hall)
November 27, 2008
Torii gateway to Tamayama-Inari-Sha. Senbon Torii (thousand Torii) are beyond this Torii.
June 24, 2001
Entrance of Senbon Torii.
June 24, 2001
Tunnels of torii gateways Inside of a tunnel of torii gateways Outside of a tunnel
Tunnels of Torii gateways that lead to Okusha-Hohaisho.
January 26, 2002
Inside of a tunnel of torii gateways
November 27, 2008
Outside of a tunnel.
November 27, 2008
Okusha Hohaisho A stone stairway covered by Torii gateways O-Tsuka
Okusha Hohaisho (a place of worship at the inner shrine), a place to bow toward the three ridges, i.e. Ichi-no-mine, Ni-no-mine and San-no-mine.
November 27, 2008
A stone stairway covered by Torii gateways.
June 24, 2001
O-Tsuka, stone monuments. These are not tombstones. People who believe in Inari God sometimes give the god another name. They inscribe the name on a stone and place it in the precinct of the shrine. It is said that about ten thousand of these monuments are in the precinct.
June 24, 2001
Tanaka-sha Ganriki-sha Rikimatsu-sha
Tanaka-sha. This is a site where Tanaka God used to be enshrined. Now the god is enshrined in Honden together with other four gods.
June 24, 2001
A fountain in the shape of a fox at Ganriki-sha. "Ganriki" literally means "Eye-Power" and the god is believed to cure of eye disease.
June 24, 2001
Rikimatsu-sha
June 24, 2001
Kito-den Stone stairs to Ichinomine Ichinomine
Kito-den, a small hall for prayer, at Gozen-dani.
November 27, 2008
Stone stairs to Ichi-no-mine, the highest peak of the precinct.
November 27, 2008
Ichi-no-mine, the first peak. At the highest peak of Mt. Inari was a shrine called Ue-no-Yashiro in which a god named Omiya-no-Me-no-Okami was enshrined. Suehiro-Okami is worshiped here now.
June 24, 2001
Ninomine Sannomine A twin-fox stone lantern
Ni-no-mine, the second peak. Satahiko-no-Okami was enshrined here in Naka-no-Yashiro shrine. Aoki-Okami is now worshipped here.
November 27, 2008
San-no-mine, the third peak. Uka-no-Mitama-no-Okami was enshrined here in Shita-no-Yashiro. Shiragiku-Okami is now worshipped here.
November 27, 2008
A strangely shaped stone lantern. A couple of foxes sit facing each other.
November 27, 2008